1055 University Ave, Dubuque, IA 52001
Facebook Twitter RSS Feed Email Delays and Cancellations Listen Live

Weather

KCRG TV9 First Alert Forecast For Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 17, 2019 

TODAY:  PARTLY SUNNY, HIGH AROUND 80. SOUTHEAST WIND 5 TO 10 MPH.                 

TONIGHT:  MOSTLY CLOUDY. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS.  LOW IN THE UPPER 60’S.  

TOMORROW:  MOSTLY CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS. HIGH IN THE LOWER 80’S. SOUTHWEST WIND 10 TO 15 MPH.

EXTENDED OUTLOOK MONDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY: 

SUNNY MONDAY, HIGHS IN THE MID 80’S. MOSTLY CLOUDY TUESDAY, WITH A CHANCE OF SCATTERED SHOWERS AND STORMS. SUNNY WEDNESDAY,  HIGH IN THE UPPER 70’S.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE:  10.1-FEET & FALLING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


KCRG Weather Blog

Drought conditions continue across Eastern Iowa

Drought conditions continue to plague Eastern Iowa. With the latest update this past week, areas are now under the “Moderate Drought” stage, where most of Eastern Iowa is abnormally dry. This did include Monday night’s rain. Over the past month areas in Eastern Iowa are anywhere between 0.5-2.5” below normal for rainfall. We do have some hope for rain Sunday morning, where areas could see the potential of 1-2”, but that is only if heavy rain happens. It is possible, but not a guarantee on how much rain some will get. After Sunday, rain chances stay slim in the forecast, so, unfortunately, no relief in sight for the moment. We will continue to monitor drought conditions and will have another update this upcoming Thursday.

Great Iowa State Fair weather so far

This is the final weekend of the Iowa State Fair, and overall, the weather has been fabulous throughout. With only 0.37” of rainfall as of Friday, the weather has been pretty dry with a decent amount of sunshine each day, too. That total is 1.20” below a typical fair. Granted, we have to get through this weekend’s rain chance, which will probably add some to that. As for temperature, you really couldn’t ask for better during this stretch. The average high has been around 84 degrees, with the warmest day so far at 89.

Beyond the Weather: Look for the moon

The last full month summer is half over. Summer provides some of the nicest temperatures to venture outside at night. However, with more moisture in the air, the nighttime sky often takes on a hazy appearance. But even with a slightly obscured sky, you can always take a look and find the moon. August’s full moon occurred Thursday at 7:29 a.m. The moon will be around from sunset Thursday until just before dawn Friday. In the Northern Hemisphere, this full moon is known as the Sturgeon Moon, Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon. In the Southern Hemisphere, where this is the second full moon of the winter season, it is known as the Snow Moon, Storm Moon, Hunger Moon or Wolf moon. Plan on spending some time outside the next few nights to view the nearly-full moon. Also this weekend, as the moon moves into the waning gibbous phase, it rises later in the night. This gives us an opportunity to see a daytime moon right after sunrise. Just after sunrise this Saturday and Sunday, look low on the western horizon. You should find our daytime moon. Happy stargazing!

Wednesday’s weather took us five weeks into the future

Wednesday’s high temperatures were mostly in the lower to middle 70s. While this isn’t unusual in mid-August, it was still about ten degrees below normal. Afternoons in the 70 to 75 degree range are typical for the middle to even late part of September, so we certainly had a sneak peek at autumn. For most, Wednesday was the coolest day in nearly two months. This was the first time this month that Cedar Rapids didn’t have a high in the 80s. On average, there are four sub-80 highs by now. In Iowa City, it’s even more amazing – this was the first time with a high in the 70s since June 24 – a 50-day streak! Click the link on each city if you want a calendar listing of high temperatures from June 1 through August 14: Cedar Rapids Dubuque "Iowa City Waterloo

Fog becomes more likely later in August

While summer fog isn’t common in Iowa, the back half of August does see a spike in the morning hours, especially between 4 a.m. and 8 a.m. We’re starting to see that change, since the past three mornings have featured fog over portions of eastern Iowa during those hours. This is due to maturing crops transpiring moisture into the air, along with a rapid loss of daylight. These longer nights and high humidity values lead to an increased potential of fog. Since the crop is late this year by a week or two, the risk of foggy mornings may extend well into September.