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National News

National News

September 17, 2020

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — President Donald Trump points to spiking crime and delivers stark statistics on murders and shootings as part of his “law and order” campaign emphasis that suggests cities are overrun with violence that only he can stop. Several cities have seen a sobering surge in murders this summer, but those numbers capture only a small snapshot of crime in the United States, and Trump’s strategy highlights how data can be easily molded to suit the moment. During a town hall Tuesday in Pennsylvania, Trump spoke about how crime was soaring in cities where there have been protests against police brutality after the death of George Floyd in May.

 

PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) — Rivers swollen by Hurricane Sally’s rains could mean more problems for parts of south Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. Sally has diminished to a tropical depression. But it’s still a rainmaker as it has moved Thursday into Georgia, on a path to the Carolinas. Authorities warned that rain from the storm could swell eight waterways in Florida and Alabama to record levels. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis warned residents and visitors of possible river flooding in the coming days. The National Weather Service says the small city of Brewton, Alabama, can expect moderate to major flooding.

 

NEW YORK (AP) — The first volume of former President Barack Obama’s memoir is coming out Nov. 17, two weeks after Election Day. It’s called “A Promised Land” and will cover his swift and historic rise to the White House and his first term in office. The publication date for the second volume has not yet been determined. The 768-page book is the most anticipated presidential memoir in memory, as much or more because of the quality of the writing than for any possible revelations. He has been called the most literary president since Lincoln and has already written two highly praised, million-selling books.

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is preparing to declare that all international sanctions against Iran have been restored, despite overwhelming opposition. Few countries believe restoring all international sanctions is legal, and the U.S. move could provoke a credibility crisis at the United Nations. Virtually alone in the world, the Trump administration will announce on Saturday that U.N. sanctions on Iran that were eased under the 2015 nuclear deal are back in force. But the other members of the U.N. Security Council, including U.S. allies, say the U.S. lost its legal standing to act when President Donald Trump withdrew from the nuclear accord.