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KCRG TV 9 First Alert Forecast

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2019          

TODAY:  CLOUDY AND WINDY WITH FALLING TEMPERATURES.  NORTHWEST WIND 15-25

                MPH & GUSTY.               

TONIGHT:  CLEARING AND COLDER.  LOW 23. 

TOMORROW:  MOSTLY SUNNY.  HIGH 36. 

EXTENDED OUTLOOK SATURDAY THROUGH MONDAY: 

DRY.  HIGH’S IN THE 40’S.   LOW’S IN THE 20’S.

 

 

 

 

 

 


KCRG Weather Blog

Daylight shortens for only one more month

The first day of winter, December 21, is just one month away. That’s the day when we have our shortest daylight, and after that, the days will get longer again. Thursday’s sunrise was at 7:03 a.m., and sunset is 4:41 p.m. That gives nine hours, 37 minutes, and 37 seconds of daylight. On the first day of winter, the sun will rise at 7:31 a.m. and set at 4:38 p.m. providing nine hours, seven minutes, and eight seconds of daylight. Between now and then, we’ll lose 30 minutes and 29 seconds of light. The earliest sunset of 4:35 p.m. happens in a couple of weeks, but the latest sunrise won’t happen until the beginning of January.

Beyond the Weather: Meteor outburst

If all goes just right, we have the chance to see an intense but very brief meteor shower later this week. Thursday night, we may have the opportunity to see the alpha Monocerotid meteor shower. First and foremost, we need to have a clear sky. And as with all meteor showers, you will need to get to a dark location away from city light pollution. The time frame for the shower falls sometime between 10:30 p.m. and 11:10 pm. The place to look is very low on the eastern horizon radiating from the constellation Monoceros the Unicorn. There is no guarantee that an outburst will occur, but when it happened in 1995, several meteors per minute were seen. Good luck and happy stargazing!

Ingredients for fog development

With recent snowmelt and rainfall, we’re bound to start talking about fog some more. There are two types of fog we deal with. The first is radiation fog. This type of fog is the most common and forms on clear and calm nights, usually after a rain or very wet snow event has occurred. The “radiation” part of the name is because the heat from the day radiates back out to space when the night sky is clear. Advection fog is the other type, which is formed by moist air flowing over the cold ground. This is most common in the heart of winter when the snowpack tends to be well-established.

Next big system: Not a snowy one here

A potent weather system will move across the Midwest Wednesday and Thursday. However, unlike past systems, this one’s expected track puts us on the “warm” side of it, producing mainly rain. “Warm” is a relative term, since we’re expecting highs to just be in the upper 40s to perhaps 50s, depending on when the cold front moves through. Rain looks likely Wednesday night into Thursday, probably wrapping up by afternoon. Rainfall amounts around a half-inch will be possible based on Monday's data. If any snow does fall locally, it would be as precipitation is ending while cooler air wraps southward. The majority of snow should fall across the Plains into Minnesota.

Back to normal this week

We are now in the middle of November and after a very chilly start to the month we will be back on average this week. Normally, temperatures this time of year are in the mid-40s. We got a sneak peek of that on Friday and Saturday with temperatures in the 40s. A wintery mix will cool down temperatures a bit on Sunday, but as we start the new week, it’s going to be very nice. We will be dry throughout Tuesday. Highs will start in the low 40s Monday and rise into the upper 40s by Wednesday. Some locations may even get a sneak peek of 50s before another system pushes through Thursday, cooling temperatures down again.