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KCRG TV9 First Alert Forecast For Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2019                     

       DENSE FOG ADVISORY FOR SOUTHWEST WISCONSIN UNTIL 10AM 

TODAY:  PARTLY CLOUDY AND HUMID WITH ISOLATED SHOWERS AND STORMS POSSIBLE

                EARLY AND AGAIN LATER TODAY.  HIGH 84.  SOUTH WIND 5-15 MPH.               

TONIGHT:  PARTLY CLOUDY WITH ISOLATED SHOWERS AND STORMS.  LOW 68. 

TOMORROW:  PARTLY CLOUDY WITH SHOWERS AND STORMS LIKELY.  HIGH 74. 

EXTENDED OUTLOOK SUNDAY THROUGH TUESDAY: 

A CHANCE OF SHOWERS AND STORMS SUNDAY, DRY MONDAY AND TUESDAY.  HIGH’S IN THE 70’S.  LOW’S IN THE 50’S & 60’S. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE:  15.1-FEET AND RISING

 

 

 

 

 

 


KCRG Weather Blog

Beyond the Weather: Autumnal equinox

The astronomical change from summer to fall is happening in just a few days. Fall’s arrival is set for Monday, September 23 at 2:50 a.m. Central Time. This is the point in time when the sun’s rays hit directly over the equator. There are people who make all types of claims of things that can happen only at the precise moment of the equinox. Balancing eggs or brooms, for example, does not happen only on the equinox. If you can do it at 2:50 a.m. on Monday, you can do it any other time during the year. Also, it will not get and stay immediately cooler once autumn begins. The days do continue to grow shorter, meaning less daylight, so our average temperatures fall. However, we can still get both warm and cold days since the turning of a calendar page does not dictate the weather. Here’s to a great fall!

Rainfall totals from September 19, 2019

Very heavy rain fell across northern Iowa and southwestern Wisconsin the morning of September 19. Amounts of two to four inches were common, which led to localized flooding. These are the amounts that fell through about noon. These totals come from a variety of sources. West of Dorchester (Winneshiek County): 6.00” Chester (Howard County): 5.00” Wadena (Fayette County): 3.65” Charles City (Floyd County): 3.40” Near Riceville (Howard County): 3.20” Near Rockford (Floyd County) 3.15” Near Burton (Grant County, WI): 2.77” Saratoga (Howard County): 2.52” Charles City (Floyd County): 2.44” Near Bassett (Chickasaw County): 2.40” Near Dorchester (Allamakee County): 2.33 Spillville (Winneshiek County): 2.17” Dubuque Airport (Dubuque County): 2.10” Elkader (Clayton County): 2.09” Near Cresco (Howard County): 2.07” Dorchester (Allamakee County: 2.60” Charles City Airport (Floyd County): 2.00” Garber (Clayton County): 1.85” Littleport (Clayton County: 1.80”

Has this month been unusually warm? No, it hasn’t

We’ve been getting in on the (probably) last bit of summer weather lately, with most days getting into the 80s. While it seems that this month has been notably warm so far, that just isn’t the case. Cedar Rapids’ average high over September 1st through 17th was 78.9 degrees. Last year, it was 80.8 degrees, a full two degrees warmer! In fact, half of the time since 2010, the first 17 days of September have been warmer than this one. 2018: 80.8° 2017: 79.2° 2016: 79.4° 2015: 82.0° 2014: 71.9° 2013: 82.2° 2012: 77.7° 2011: 73.5° 2010: 76.4° So why does it seem like we’re in an awfully summer-like situation? One reason is perception: we’re really bad at remembering things like the weather from as far back as a year ago or longer! The second reason is that it has been unusually humid. The amount of time with a dew point of at least 65 degrees this month has been well above the average. We’re approaching 200 hours this month with that level of mugginess. Since 2010, only three times has September had more than 200 hours of that, and that’s over the entire month! As is often the case, it’s not so much the heat… it’s the humidity.

Oppressive humidity pulled all the way to Canada this week

The huge ridge of warm high pressure over us refuses to budge, leading to oppressive humidity being pulled well to the north. In fact, as low pressure develops off to our west, July-like mugginess will be pulled all the way to northern Minnesota and even into south-central Canada! With this much moisture being pulled north this late in the season, we’re bound to see locally heavy rainfall amounts and possibly some stronger thunderstorms. Look for this high humidity to be locked in through at least Saturday.

Summer’s 80s keep coming

Summer ends next Monday, and we’re certainly feeling the warmth to finish off the season. Including Monday, Cedar Rapids has already had eight days this month with a high of 80 degrees or warmer. That’s the average for the entire month, and we have at least a few more to add to the tally just this week. Whatever we end up with, it’ll be far short of the record for September. That was 23 days with 80 or warmer, set in 1908. Dubuque is having its sixth day of getting to at least 80 degrees this month. The September record there is 19 days, set in 1895. Iowa City is in the lead for 80 or warmer this month. Monday is Day 12 making that mark. At the airport, the record is 21 days in 2005. However, the longer-term climate site in Iowa City had 25 days in 1908. Waterloo is marking its ninth September day of 80 or warmer on Monday. Like Cedar Rapids, Waterloo’s record for this month is 23 days, set in 1908.